Purple Dead Nettle: Facts, Uses and Nutrition (2022)

Table of Contents
Purplenettle What Does Purple Dead Nettle Look Like? Purple deadnettlelook alike Where Does Purple Dead Nettle Grow? Distinguishing Features OF Purple Dead Nettle Dead nettle weed Purple stingingnettle Purple stinging nettle flower Purple deadnettleweeds with purple flowers Can You Eat Purple Dead Nettle? Deadnettleedible Can You Eat Purple Dead Nettle Raw? How To Eat Purple Dead Nettle? How To Make Purple Dead Nettle Tea Nettletea for allergies Nettleleaf for allergies Deadnettleuses Medicinal Uses Of Purple Dead Nettle Purple Dead Nettle Medicinal Uses Therapeutic Dead Nettle Lamium Purple Medicinal Uses How To Use Purple Dead Nettle For Allergies Purple dead nettle benefits Herbal Uses Of Purple Dead Nettle #1 Purple Dead Nettle Herbal Tincture #2 Purple Dead Nettle Cough Drops #3 Purple Dead Nettle Infused Oils #4 Herbal Poultice for Small Wounds and Insect Bites #5 Purple Dead Nettle Herbal Lotions How To Make Purple Dead Nettle Salve How to Make The Salve How To Use Purple Dead Nettle Magical Uses Of Purple Dead Nettle Purple dead nettle magical uses FAQS What is purple dead nettle good for? How to get rid of purple dead nettle? Is purple dead nettle poisonous to dogs? Is purple dead nettle poisonous to horses? Is purple dead nettle invasive? Do bees like dead nettle? Is purple dead nettle a legume? Is purple dead nettle good for bees? Wood nettle vs stinging nettle How To Grow Purple Dead Nettle Purple Dead Nettle Foraging Dead Nettle Seeds Henbit Henbit vs deadnettle Purple Dead Nettle Recipes Purple Dead Nettle Soup Wild Weeds Pesto with Dead Nettle Purple Dead Nettle Dye FAQs Videos

We are already furiously active on our homestead in the early part of the Fall, and this year, with an unprecedented absence of snow on the ground so late in the year, it’s an opportunity to be reminded that a jaunt around the wilder areas of our neighbourhood might yield any abundance of some edible weeds. Beth Chatto launched it in 1976, receiving it from a client. ‘Beedham’s White’ has vivid yellow leaves with white stripe and white buds, but is less floral than certain other varieties and may be vulnerable to moist soils winter dieout.

In terms of the health effects of herbs, I once worked for a German herbalist and aromatherapist who assured me that in the past, Europeans who made a habit of using herbs in their diets fared better than their urban counterparts in the face of a slew of virulent diseases.

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As my holistic health studies progressed, I discovered that herbs, though they aren’t cultivated for agriculture, have a far higher proclivity for absorbing micronutrients that are sometimes removed from farmed fields. They have several nutrients that our bodies need for optimal health as wild food sources.

To maintain a great-looking group of plants around your house, you don’t have to be a die-hard gardener or a clever florist. A manicured and weed-free lawn is considered by many homeowners to be just as pretty as any rose garden. When you maintain a sea of grass, you must remove any plant that is not yours. How do you get rid of purple dead nettle sounds like a daunting management, and is only one such challenge faced year after year by turf keepers. It sounds confusing, but don’t be afraid! To support you with this formidable enemy, we have some deathnettle weed management pointers. This widespread weedy plant belongs to the mint family and forms early groundcover mats with fluffy, spade-shaped leaves and delicate purple-pink flowers, a nice addition to a spring weed bouquet and it creates early ground-cover mats with fuzzy, spade-shaped leaf and small purple-pink flowers, a beautiful addition to a spring weed bouquet.

The dead purple nettle is not synonymous with stinging nettles. As shown by its square stem, it is a member of the mint family. The term “dead nettle” refers to the fact that the leaves are like a nettle, but the stinging hairs are absent, so that the sting is considered “dead.”

It is an annual herb, one of a small group of annuals for winter. The seeds of winter annual plants germinate in fall and form a rosette of overwintering leaves. The rosettes are able to withstand winters in USDA growing zones 4 through 8 here in the US. They complete their vegetative growth by the following spring, rising up to 12 inches tall. Flowers and seeds are produced by plants and then die in late spring or early summer.

CONSULT YOUR DOCTOR BEFORE TAKING ANY HERBAL CONCOCTION

Purplenettle

The purple nettle is a plant that can be found throughout the United States. It has green leaves and purple flowers, and it grows in clumps. The purple nettle is a member of the mint family, and it has a unique flavor that some people enjoy. The purple nettle is also a good source of vitamins and minerals, band it can be used to make tea or soup.

On a lighter side, people often ask me what my favorite flower is, and I always have a hard time answering because I love so many different types of flowers. But if I had to choose just one, it would be the purple nettle. I love the deep, rich color of the petals, and the way they seem to shimmer in the sunlight. I also can’t resist the sweet fragrance of the flowers, which reminds me of summer evenings spent sitting on the porch with a glass of lemonade.

But beyond its beauty, the purple nettle also has some amazing properties. Did you know that it’s an excellent source of vitamins A and C? In fact, just a handful of blossoms can provide your daily recommended dose of these essential nutrients. And if that’s not enough, the purple nettle is also a natural diuretic, meaning it can help rid your body of excess fluid. So next time you’re looking for a stunning flower to admire, be sure to give the purple nettle a try!

What Does Purple Dead Nettle Look Like?

Looking for true nettles? There is also a reddish tint on the leaves. Owing to the colouration of the leaves, the plants are known as Red Deadnettles in Great Britain. Often, the pollen is red.

At a time of year when nothing else is blooming, the flowers are a major source of pollen and nectar for beneficial insects. The flowers are tubular in form and grow at the tops of the stems in a cluster. It ranges from pink to lavender in color. April is Bloom Season. Flowers will last for as long as six weeks. They are replaced by four seeds each as they fade.

In full sun, the plants grow best but can tolerate some shade. They can grow as long as it is not constantly wet, in almost any form of soil. They quickly reseed, sometimes creating mats of plants in our early spring gardens’ open spaces.

Purple dead nettles are easy to transplant from the wild if you want a readily available source of spring greens and medicinal herbs nearby. In either spring or fall, dig up the plants and plant them in your yard. Specialty seedhouses also supply the seeds. You should try collecting the seeds straight from the plants if you are adventurous. In the fall, plant them by pressing them into the soil tightly and then covering them with a layer of mulch.

Purple deadnettlelook alike


If you’re like me, you’re always on the lookout for plants that look like they might be edible, but you’re not sure. Well, today I’m here to help you out with one that’s been giving me fits: the purple dead nettle. This plant looks a lot like its close cousin, the stinging nettle, but it doesn’t have the stingers. It’s also got a beautiful purple flower that makes it look really tempting. But before you go chowing down, there are a few things you should know.

First of all, while the purple dead nettle is related to the stinging nettle, it’s not actually in the same family. So if you’re allergic to stinging nettles, you’re probably not going to be allergic to purple dead nettle. Second of all, this plant is actually edible. In fact, it’s been used as a food source for centuries. You can eat the leaves raw or cooked, and they’re said to have a slightly bitter taste.

The purple dead nettle can also be used as a medicinal plant. The leaves can be used to treat skin conditions, such as eczema, and the flowers can be used to treat bladder infections. So if you’re looking for a new wild edible to add to your repertoire, the purple dead nettle is a good one to try. Just make sure you know what you’re doing before you eat it, and always consult a wild edible guidebook or an expert.

Where Does Purple Dead Nettle Grow?

The purplish dead nettles are one of the first signs of spring in most people’s backyard. In the spring, they pop up almost out of nowhere. You would assume that they are a native plant due to their ubiquity in our landscape and you would be mistaken. They are originally from Europe and Asia, brought here by European settlers. Owing to the many uses for the plants, purple dead nettles were a must in their gardens.

Throughout the winter months, European colonists had to rely on dried or smoked food without access to food stores or refrigeration. Spring greens, like purple dead nettle, became an essential part of their diet when spring began, with food resources dwindling, before they could plant and then harvest from their gardens.

Distinguishing Features OF Purple Dead Nettle


Foraging for purple dead nettle (Lamium purpureum) is generally fairly simple due to its widespread existence. It is native to Europe and Asia, but has become widespread in gardens and disturbed areas in North America.

I can almost guarantee that at one time or another you have seen the purple dead nettle with its upper leaves growing. You may not have noticed it, as it can be very unclear at times, but if you really start paying attention to the plants around you, I’m sure you’re going to see them growing.

The purple dead nettle is one of those plants that you instantly know when you see a photo of it, but never knew what it was called. Leaves: opposite, often heart-shaped,.4 to 1.6 inches broad, almost as wide, deep green or purple tinged; coarse-hairy surface; shallow, rounded teeth margins; stalk. 2 to 1.6 inches long; base heart-shaped, almost straight or rounded; tip blunt or rounded, sometimes pointed; leaves narrower, more egg-shaped or almost circular.

I’d seen it my whole life, it took years before I had any idea of what it really was! I was delighted to discover its advantages, just as I was with the dead purple nettle.


Often it grows in big patches, which can be irritating if your garden happens to be that patch, but it makes it easier to pick!

I have a fair bit of it growing in my backyard, and when I go out for walks, I see it everywhere. Finally, to see what it was, I wanted to look it up, and I was delighted to find out that it was edible and medicinal!

Because of its obvious similarity to stinging nettle, without the sting, purple dead nettle is in the mint family and is called “dead nettle” (or sometimes “deadnettle”). I’m quite puzzled by this, because I don’t think it necessarily looks like actual nettles at all, except to each of them.

With its square stem (like all mint family plants), fluffy leaves, and purple tops with little pink flowers, it is simple to recognise.

Typically, they grow relatively small, but can often reach up to 8-10 inches tall.

There are no poisonous look-alikes on the purple dead nettle. For henbit (Lamium amplexicaule), which is closely associated with another tasty edible herb, it is often confused.

Dead nettle weed

I’m sure you’ve all seen dead nettle weed before – it’s that pesky little plant that seems to pop up everywhere in springtime. But did you know that dead nettle weed can actually be good for your garden?

Dead nettle weed is a member of the mint family, and it has a long history of use in herbal medicine. The leaves and flowers of the plant are edible, and they can be used to make tea or added to salads. Dead nettle weed is also a good source of nectar for bees and other pollinators.

So, don’t be too quick to pull up those dead nettle weeds next time you see them sprouting in your garden. You might just be surprised at how beneficial they can be!

Purple stingingnettle

The purple stinging nettle is found all over the world and has been used for centuries as a medicinal herb. The plant has a long history of use for treating joint pain, muscle aches, and eczema. The leaves and stems of the purple stinging nettle are covered in tiny sharp hairs that release a chemical when they come into contact with skin. This chemical causes a stinging sensation and can cause a rash or blisters. Despite the unpleasant side effects, the purple stinging nettle is a valuable medicinal herb. The plant contains compounds that have anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties, which make it useful for treating pain. Additionally, the purple stinging nettle is a good source of vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C, iron, and calcium.

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Purple stinging nettle flower

The purple stinging nettle flower is a type of flower that can be found in various parts of the world. It is known for its unique purple color, and it has a number of therapeutic properties. Some of the benefits associated with this flower include its ability to improve cognitive function, reduce inflammation, and boost energy levels. Additionally, the purple stinging nettle flower is also known for its ability to improve sleep quality. If you are looking for a way to improve your overall health, then consider adding this flower to your diet.

There are many different varieties of stinging nettle, but they all have one thing in common – their sting! The leaves and stems of these plants contain tiny hairs that release a nasty chemical when touched. This chemical causes an itchy, red rash in most people, hence the plant’s common name.

Despite its sting, stinging nettle has many valuable uses. The leaves can be dried and used as a herb in teas and other remedies, and the flowers are edible and can be added to salads or cooked as a vegetable. Nettle fibres can also be extracted from the stems and used to make cloth, paper, and even insulation. So if you’re ever faced with a field of stinging nettles, don’t be too afraid – just be sure to wear gloves!

Purple deadnettleweeds with purple flowers

Purple deadnettle weed is a wildflower with striking purple blooms. This weed can be commonly found in disturbed areas, such as lawns, gardens, and construction sites. The leaves are heart-shaped, and the flowers are about 1 inch across. The purple deadnettle weed can be identified by its purple flowers and by the fact that its leaves are not toothed. This weed can be toxic if ingested, so it is best to avoid contact with it.

(Video) Discover Amazing Purple Dead Nettle Nutritional And Medicinal Benefits

If you’re like me, you love spending time in your garden. But sometimes, despite our best efforts, weeds can spring up and take over. One type of weed that I’ve been battling lately is purple deadnettle. These fast-growing plants have purple flowers and can quickly choke out other vegetation. While they may look pretty at first, they can be very difficult to get rid of once they take hold.

Purple Dead Nettle: Facts, Uses and Nutrition (3)

I’ve found that the best way to fight purple deadnettle is to pull it up by the roots as soon as you see it. This can be a challenge, as the roots are deep and can be very tough to remove. But if you can get rid of the entire plant, it will be much less likely to come back. You can also try using a weed killer, but be careful not to damage the plants you want to keep.

No matter what method you use, it’s important to be vigilant about removing purple deadnettle before it has a chance to take over your garden. With a little bit of effort, you can keep these weeds at bay and enjoy your garden in peace.

Can You Eat Purple Dead Nettle?


Not only is Purple Dead Nettle a wild edible green, but a superfood that is highly nutritious – so truly, yes you can eat purple dead nettle as it one of the wild edible plants you can find out there! With the purple tops being even a little sweet, the leaves are edible. Since the leaves are relatively fuzzy, rather than being the star of the show, they are best used as a herb garnish or combined with other greens in recipes.

The plant as a whole is edible. The taste is very mild, grassy – you can eat the stem and all of it, or pluck the leafy tops off. A thick hairy down covers the leaves – and this can take away some of the mild flavor. However, you quickly get used to it.

Purple dead-nettle is edible; in reality, the whole plant can be eaten. It has a moderate, almost grassy, flower taste, with the purple tops being slightly sweet.

While being in the mint tribe, it does not have a minty flavour. It may be found in greens, soups, smoothies, and teas.

In general, it should be used in the same way as every other green. The plant may also be finely chopped and used as a garnish in the same way that a herb might be.

To get the most out of the nutrient advantages, throw a bunch into a smoothie – banana and mango are particularly nice complements, as mentioned below.

Deadnettleedible

The dead nettle is an edible plant that can be found in many parts of the world. It has a slightly bitter taste but is otherwise quite palatable. The leaves and flowers can both be eaten, and are best harvested when they are young. Dead nettle is a good source of vitamins A and C, as well as minerals such as potassium and calcium. It can be eaten raw or cooked and is a popular ingredient in soups and salads.

Some caution should be exercised when eating dead nettle, as it can sometimes cause skin irritation. It is also important to make sure that the plant has not been sprayed with herbicides or pesticides, as these chemicals can be harmful.

Can You Eat Purple Dead Nettle Raw?

I’ve got this developing all over my yard, and I finally got the nerve to try it out last night as one of my new food source. I based my stinging nettle recipe on Emmymade’s (which she got from Cooking Apicius), but I didn’t have all of the ingredients and had to make certain substitutions. I rinsed and chopped a huge bunch of Purple Dead Nettle (the recipe called for Stinging Nettle), then added multiple cranks of fresh community pepper, 1 TB orange juice concentrate (the recipe called for grape concentrate), 1 1/2 TB fish sauce, and 4 TB olive oil to a large pot and brought to a simmer. I inserted my Dead Nettle and boiled it all down, then drained it, emptied it in a fry pan, spread it out, beat four eggs in a cup, poured them over the nettles, then cooked it all together, rolling it around with a spatula until it was done. It was eaten with toast and grated parmesan cheese on top. It was delicious!

The plant is edible, as per Herbal Academy. Some claim the whole plant is edible, save the roots. So the next question is, Can you eat purple dead nettle raw? YES! In salads, the leaves are eaten raw or used in stir fries. Thinly chopped, they flavor the sauces. With floral notes, the taste is kind of grassy. Surprisingly, it does not taste minty, even though it is a member of the mint family.

How To Eat Purple Dead Nettle?

This plant (purple dead nettle) has been all over my life in Southern and Coastal New Jersey, where I work. I was in the backyard the other day and said aloud, “It has to be nutritious.”

It is also possible to apply purple deadnettle to soups, salads, or mix into smoothies. Basically, you can use some other green leafy herb or vegetable.

How To Make Purple Dead Nettle Tea

Making it into a tea is indeed a nice way to reap the benefits of purple dead nettle – just bear in mind that consuming a significant quantity of it can have a laxative impact.

Purple dead nettle, either fresh plant material or dried, may be made into an infusion or tea. This may be the simplest way to enjoy its advantages, but if used in large quantities, it may also have a laxative effect.

For dried purple nettle to be used in tea:
For every 8 ounces (1 cup) of boiling water, add 3 tablespoons of dried leaves.
Enable 5-8 minutes to steep, then strain to taste and sweeten.

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To make a dead nettle tea that will naturally help your liver and kidney functions, combine with other herbs such as burdock, dandelion root, and milk thistle.

Nettletea for allergies

Springtime is a beautiful time of year. The flowers are in bloom and the birds are singing. But for many people, spring also brings pesky allergies. If you’re looking for a natural way to ease your allergies, try nettle tea. Nettle is a herb that has been used for centuries to treat a variety of ailments, including allergies, arthritis, and even UTIs. Nettle tea can be made by steeping a handful of fresh or dried nettle leaves in boiling water for 5-10 minutes. The key to making an effective allergy tea is to use fresh nettle leaves if possible. Nettle leaves are available at many health food stores, or you can grow your own. If you can’t find fresh nettle leaves, you can also use dried nettle leaves. Just make sure to steep them for a little longer, about 15 minutes. Give nettle tea a try and see if it helps you feel better during allergy season!

Nettleleaf for allergies

Some people swear by nettle leaf for allergies. It’s thought to work because the nettle plant contains histamine, which is a chemical that your body releases during an allergic reaction. Taking nettle leaf may help to reduce the amount of histamine that your body produces, and this could help to alleviate your allergy symptoms. Nettle leaf is available in supplement form, or you can drink it as a tea. If you decide to try nettle leaf, be sure to talk to your healthcare provider first to make sure it’s safe for you.

Deadnettleuses

The leaves and flowers of dead nettle can be used fresh or dried in a number of ways. They make a flavorful addition to soups, stews, and salads, and can also be used to make herbal tea. In addition, dead nettle can be used as a natural remedy for a number of health conditions. It is said to be helpful for treating everything from urinary tract infections to eczema.

Dead nettle also has some practical uses. The leaves can be used to dye fabric a deep purple color, and the flowers can be used to produce a yellow dye. This dye can be used to color yarn, fabric, and other craft items. So if you’re looking for an herb that’s both beautiful and useful, give dead nettle a try. You won’t be disappointed.

Medicinal Uses Of Purple Dead Nettle

Many people are asking regarding how to use purple dead nettle medicinal uses. This plant is well-known for its therapeutic properties and medicinal benefits, including anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and antifungal properties. It also acts as a diuretic, astringent, and diaphoretic.

There are a lot of dead nettle benefits and this Purple dead-nettle is well-known for mitigating allergy symptoms; in reality, its antifungal and antibacterial compounds are actually being researched in an effort to figure out whether it has antiallergy properties.

It may also prevent allergic sufferers from secondary throat and bronchial infections.

The purple dead-nettle plant’s leaves may be used to avoid bleeding from wounds or burns, and its vitamin C and flavonoids function together to strengthen the immune system and prevent infection.

It was shown to be successful against the E. coli bacteria and others in a study reported in 2007 in the Hacepttepe University Journal of the Faculty of Pharmacy in Turkey. In a 2008 study published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology, its anti-inflammatory properties were discovered.

As a medicinal plant, medicinal uses of purple dead nettle is all over the herbal world and is said to be extensive spanning generations upon generations. It was brewed into a tea to relieve chills and facilitate transpiration. The tea was used to treat problems with the kidneys as well. Other applications for the plant were as an astringent as well as a diuretic and purgative. To avoid bleeding, the leaves were applied to wounds.

Similar to how you would use yarrow or plantain, the leaves can be used on external wounds or cuts, or as a catapult. This will also make it a successful option for a herbal salve that is homemade.

I live in middle Tennessee, and this little jewel of a plant has taken over my yard! I’ve noticed that the bees are out now, and they’re still swarming my yard! I just wish this was rising on the other side of the fence, where we don’t waste too much time, since it will be cut down in a few weeks.

Purple Dead Nettle Medicinal Uses Therapeutic

Purple dead nettle has therapeutic advantages as well. It is recognized as being astringent, diuretic, diaphoretic and purgative in the herbal world. It’s also anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal, and anti-bacterial.

Purple deadnettle has a strong tannin content, so the herbal infusion produced from it can also be used as a diarrhoea antidote, as tannins aid mucous membranes compress, covering sores or abrasions.

These tannins are also essential in purple deadnettle’s primary usage as a wound poultice. You may produce your own poultice for slight wounds, scrapes, or bug bites by simply picking a tiny handful of the leaves and chewing them until they imitate green paste.

Dead Nettle Lamium Purple Medicinal Uses

The common name lamia comes from the Greek word lamia, which means “devouring beast.” This applies to the flower’s helmet-like form (galeate), which resembles open jaws.

The common name ‘Archangel’ can refer to the fact that they are non-stinging.

(Video) The Purple Dead Nettle: Nutritional & medicinal Wild Edible flower 🌸(Lamium purpureum)

Early cultivation is thought to have brought this plant to Britain, and evidence of it has been discovered in Bronze Age deposits. Low growth and blooms during the year, even colder weather in winter conditions.

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Astringent, diaphoretic, diuretic, purgative, and styptic are all properties of the entire plant. Dried leaves have been used as a poultice to stop haemorrhaging, whereas fresh bruised leaves have been added to external wounds and injuries in traditional medicine. The leaves may also be turned into a tea and consumed to encourage perspiration and kidney discharge in the treatment of chills.

How To Use Purple Dead Nettle For Allergies

Purple deadnettle is used in the prevention of allergies in certain areas of Europe, despite the fact that it is an aggressive plant. “Purple Dead-nettle, a natural source of flavonoids including quercetin, can boost immune system efficiency thus lowering exposure to allergens and reducing inflammation. Flavonoids’ anti-allergy properties stem from their capacity to reduce histamine release.”

It’s good for the kidneys and can also help with allergies that are seasonal. Many people have told me that relieving allergy symptoms has been really effective! Alternatively, it can be tinted using the same form as this lemon balm tincture It’s fine for the liver, and can also help seasonal allergies.

When you have allergies, taking Purple Dead-nettle will help avoid secondary infections of the sinuses, throat, and lower respiratory tract. There are no reported side effects. The anti-inflammatory, astringent, diuretic, diaphoretic, antimicrobial, antifungal, and purgative properties of Purple Dead-nettle have not been thoroughly investigated and reported. For food and drugs, collect the whole above-ground, aerial pieces. I am proud to say that I am already allergy-free as a result of the following procedure!

Infuse 1 cup boiling water with 1 heaping teaspoon dried herb for 10 minutes, sealed. Strain and drink as much as you want. Put 1 oz. dried herb in a quart container, or 1/3 jar packed with chopped fresh herb, fill with hot water, then cover to use as a regular tonic for chronic conditions. Allow to sit for 3-4 hours before drinking one quart a day only before and after allergy season.

On the other hand some people may have purple dead nettle allergy so please consult with your doctor and herbalist.

Purple dead nettle benefits

Purple dead nettle is a weed that can be found in many parts of the world. Despite being a weed, it has some amazing benefits that make it worth using. Here are some of the most notable benefits of purple dead nettle:

1. Purple dead nettle is a natural pain reliever.

2. Purple dead nettle is an anti-inflammatory.

3. Purple dead nettle can help improve your circulation.

4. Purple dead nettle is a natural diuretic.

5. Purple dead nettle can help increase your energy levels.

6. Purple dead nettle is a detoxifier.7. Purple dead nettle can help improve your immune system.

8. Purple dead nettle is a natural astringent.

9. Purple dead nettle can help improve your skin health.

10. Purple dead nettle is a natural expectorant.

As you can see, purple dead nettle has a number of amazing benefits that make it worth using. If you are looking for a natural way to improve your health, then purple dead nettle is a great option.

Herbal Uses Of Purple Dead Nettle

Purple Dead-nettle has been used in traditional medicine in Europe, Asia, and Africa for centuries, and unlike stinging nettles (Urtica), it has no bite, so it is called “dead.” Anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and free radical scavenging effects similar to ascorbic acid have been shown. For allergic inflammation, it may be used fresh or dried and turned into a tea or tincture. Purple Dead-nettle, a natural source of flavonoids including quercetin, can boost immune system performance while lowering exposure to allergens and reducing inflammation. Flavonoids’ anti-allergy effects stem from their capacity to reduce histamine release.

Not only is it quick to locate, it’s perfect addition to the natural medicine cabinet as well as culinary, making it a top choice on the bucket list.

Purple Dead Nettle: Facts, Uses and Nutrition (6)

And let’s be frank, you can choose a plant that fits for both food and the cabinet you don’t have to plant, hi!

#1 Purple Dead Nettle Herbal Tincture


Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) is often used in allergy preparations.

Although purple dead nettle is not the same as stinging nettle, it is used to treat allergies by certain people.

Making tea with purple dead nettle is one way to integrate it into your life, but a tincture has a much longer shelf life and would be simpler to take.

To produce it, mix 1/4 cup purple dead nettle chopped with 1/2 cup (118 ml) high proof vodka.

Before straining, give it a good shake and keep it in the fridge for a few weeks. Store in a dark, dry location away from intense sunlight.

For inflammation and allergies, I microdose Dead Nettle Tincture for my family, using just a few drops at a time, and combining the tincture with around twice as much raw local honey to make it easier to take. You will want to work your way up to a complete dropperful of tincture at a time; everyone’s reaction is different.

Before using, see a healthcare professional if you have any medical issues, or if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

#2 Purple Dead Nettle Cough Drops

Purple dead nettle may be combined with other herbs to create delicious throat-soothing herbal cough drops.

To produce it, you’ll need the following ingredients:

tinctures of honey sugar herbal tea peppermint extract (optional, for flavour) (optional, for added herbal properties)

#3 Purple Dead Nettle Infused Oils

When dried herbs are steeped in oil, they provide a helpful flavoured oil that can be used to make salves, balms, lotions, and other products.

You’ll need about twice as much oil as dried crumbled purple dead nettle to make purple dead nettle flavoured oil.

1/4 to 1/2 of a glass canning container should be filled with crumbled dried purple dead nettle. (Depending on what you choose to produce, you may also add other dried herbs including calendula, yarrow, and so on.)


Fill the container almost to the brim with the oil of your choice and stir to combine – I used apricot kernel oil for a lighter feel, though olive or sunflower oil may also be used for most skin types. You may also combine and blend your favourite essential oils.


For a simple infusion, use the following ingredients.

(Video) Purple Dead Nettle: An Edible and Medical Weed


Place the uncovered container in a saucepan with a few inches of hot, forming a kind of improvised double boiler.
Heat the pan over a low flame for 2 to 3 hours.
Enable no water to evaporate from the tub, and keep an eye on the oil while it heats.
Remove the pan from the fire and filter out as much oil as you need for your recipe. You should top off the container with more oil and leave it to slowly infuse before you need it again.

#4 Herbal Poultice for Small Wounds and Insect Bites

If you get a pesky bug bite or a minor cut when out exploring the outdoors, you should chew up the leaves of some plants and use them as a poultice to relieve the pain or scratching, or to delay the bleeding.

Plantain (Plantago major) leaves, as well as yarrow, are popular green weeds that work well for this (Achillea millefolium). Purple dead nettle is another plant that can be attached to the chart.

Simply take a few leaves, masticate (chew) them a little, and add the resulting leaf pulp to the problem spot. Spit poultices are a good first aid ability to have since they can be very powerful.

#5 Purple Dead Nettle Herbal Lotions

Purple dead nettle flavoured oil is a wonderful supplement to lotions and creams for those who have itchy or inflamed eyes. It may also be useful in everyday wear or antipollution skincare items because of its free radical scavenging properties (see references at the bottom of this article).

In any lotion or cream recipe, you can use plain oil instead of the flavoured oil, but here’s one that I recently created and really like.

Hempseed oil (Cannabis indica) is high in important fatty acids and gives the lotion a light natural green tint. It was used in the recipe since it moisturises and balances most skin forms, as well as being beneficial for eczema, psoriasis, dermatitis, and broken skin.

How To Make Purple Dead Nettle Salve

Purple Dead Nettle Salve – The Simple Recipe to using this purple flowers to make herbal salves.


This is an ultra-basic salve with only 2 (or 3) ingredients in it. It can be used on skin that is itchy, dry, irritated, chapped, or sore.

Yield: approximately 2 ounces of salve

What You Need:

Oil infused with 1.65 oz (47 g) purple dead nettle

Beeswax of 0.25 oz (7 g)

Optional- 2 to 3 drops of basic lavender oil

How to Make The Salve


In a heatproof jar or tub, mix the infused oil and beeswax together.
Put the jar down, creating a double boiler, into a saucepan with a few inches of water.

Heat until completely molten, over medium-low heat.

Remove from the heat and, if used, apply the essential lavender oil.

Pour into a glass jar or 2-ounce tin.

Before placing the top on the bottle, let it cool.

Keep it in a cool, dry spot.

Note: Usually, the shelf life is a minimum of 12 months

How To Use Purple Dead Nettle


Along with other weeds such as henbit and chickweed, purple dead nettle can be given to chickens as a nutritious food. I chopped some of them up and gave them to my young chicks, and they went all over it, totally bonkers!

For bees, it is also an important species. Bees not only seem to prefer it over other plants, but in spring it is one of the first plants to bloom. It can also flower through the winter in mild climates, making it essential forage for bees.

It can also be used for wool and yarn to produce a natural dye!

So, how can you put it to use? It can be harvested, dried, and used in incense blends. The leaves may also be used to make a tea or a soothing decoction.

Magical Uses Of Purple Dead Nettle

Purple dead nettle is synonymous with pleasure and cheerfulness in a mystical sense. You’ll also find that it can thrive almost everywhere, except in bad soil, implying that it has a certain degree of tenacity and determination.

Based on these comparisons, you may use dead nettle in a variety of mystical ways.

When you’re feeling down, make a loose incense mix with the dried leaves and flowers to raise your spirits by using many purple dead nettle magical uses.


Do you like to be more grounded in the midst of adversity? Bring out the purple dead nettle and use it in spells to show strength and determination.


Purple dead nettle may be used in healing magic to further boost the wellbeing of the soul as well as the flesh.


Using purple dead nettle in magic that deals with the protection and safety of one’s house, work, or relationships because it is hardy and immune to obstacles.

Magical uses of purple dead nettle can mean a lot of things or suggestions but the best thing is to ask a healer who uses this one for magic or old age potions.

Purple dead nettle magical uses

While purple dead nettle may not look like much at first glance, this humble herb actually has a long history of magical uses. In folklore, it was believed to be a powerful aid for divination and dream work. Today, many still use it for these purposes, as well as for protection and banishing spells. Purple dead nettle is also said to be helpful in attracting wealth and prosperity. If you’re interested in giving this versatile herb a try, there are a few things to keep in mind. First, purple dead nettle prefers shady, moist conditions – so keep that in mind when choosing a location for your plant. Second, the leaves and flowers of the plant are both edible – though the stems can be a bit tough. And finally, purple dead nettle can be brewed into a tea, which is said to be helpful for relieving asthma and other respiratory problems. So if you’re looking for an herb with a variety of uses, purple dead nettle is definitely worth considering!

FAQS

What is purple dead nettle good for?

You can make tea out of it raw ingredients for salad, make oil infusions and make herbal salves too!

How to get rid of purple dead nettle?

It helps to water it for a few hours before you try to draw it (with thick gloves). It is a lot better if you pull it when it is smaller. If you find it blooming, take the blooms off before the seeds can dry and spread and cause more plants. If the plants with thick stems are already high, I cut them off close to the ground and paint them with chemical spray for weeds.

Is purple dead nettle poisonous to dogs?

The concern is that dogs have many poisonous plants; understanding what plants are toxic to dogs can therefore go a long way towards preventing anything tragic from happening and keeping your pet safe around the house We cannot find any clear and direct answer so better check with your veterinary doctor.

Is purple dead nettle poisonous to horses?

There is no risk on that front for either horses or humans in terms of toxicity. In reality, in spring-mix salads, young plants are sometimes tossed in. … In certain places, the purple deadnettle (Lamium purpureum) is seemingly ubiquitous during early spring and is not harmful to horses.

Is purple dead nettle invasive?

A common annual weed that belongs to the mint family, Purple Deadnettle (Lamium purpureum), explains why it is such a pest. Like other mints, purple deadnettle is an active grower that spreads anywhere it can get a foothold like wildfire.

(Video) 11 Remarkable Stinging Nettle Benefits For Hair, Body, Skin & Gout

Do bees like dead nettle?

Pollinators like these weeds which bloom

Bumble bees, honey bees and digger bees, a group of large bees that nest in the soil, are attracted to the purple deadnettle nectar. A bee mimic called the giant bee fly is also appealing to them.

Is purple dead nettle a legume?

It has zygomoroids, hood-like upper and lower lobes, petals and fang-like lower petals. the base of the tube reveals a line of corolla When life gives you lemons, it still makes life-preserving lemonade They can be made year-round, particularly in the winter. It facilitates the gathering of nectar while other supplies are scarce. Bees in March and April depend on it for protein-rich pollen.

Is purple dead nettle good for bees?

pavons are great pollinators.

It attracts bumble bees, honey bees, and ground-nesting bees are also enticing to the giant fly (Bombylius major). Bee flies as a great pollinator

Wood nettle vs stinging nettle

There is a lot of confusion between wood nettle and stinging nettle, but they are two very different plants. Wood nettle is in the buttercup family, while stinging nettle is in the mint family. Wood nettle has heart-shaped leaves and white flowers, while stinging nettle has square stems and green flowers. The biggest difference is that wood nettle doesn’t sting, while stinging nettle does. Wood nettle is edible and has a sweet taste, while stinging nettle is not edible and has a bitter taste. So if you’re ever in doubt, just remember that wood nettle doesn’t sting and stinging nettle does.

How To Grow Purple Dead Nettle

Planting purple dead nettle can provide you with your own supplies while still helping to save the bees. Right outside your house, you’ll have quick access to its fantastic benefits.

Purple dead-nettle may be started from seed found on wild plants and scattered on the field in the fall.

After that, tamp them down and cover them with mulch. They may even be grown in the spring after the danger of frost has passed.
Purple dead-nettle is a simple to grow plant that can flourish in full light, partial shade, or even full shade if the shade isn’t too dim.

If you raise them in full sun and reside in a hotter environment, be mindful that the heat will kill them, however they will come back in the fall or the following season. They thrive in wet, nutrient-rich soil, especially if it is nitrogen-rich.

They prefer neutral or mildly alkaline soils, making it an excellent groundcover for people who reside in places with a lot of limestone rock in the dirt.

Purple Dead Nettle Foraging

Purple deadnettle, in reality, is not in the Nettle Family. But many people like Purple Dead Nettle Foraging as a hobby.

Deadgrass is the most common variety in traditional farms, which carpets tens of thousands of acres after a corn or soy-related disturbance, flowering as soon as the wound has healed.

It’s not really my favourite, but it should be noted. There’s no question about it. I have mixed feelings about it, it, and I think it tastes bad when consumed raw, too. One day, I’d like to learn how to make pesto.

Purple deadnettle is the only has another similar looking relative, but both have positive nutritional value; don’t worry if you mix them up as they are associated.

Dead Nettle Seeds

While called a garden weed and frequently found growing in hedgerows, it is a very delicately pretty plant on close inspection and completely unrelated to Stinging Nettle, Urtica dioica. It carries two-lipped, pinky-purple, hooded flowers clustered in whorls in leaf axils with square stems branching at the root with Dead Nettle Seeds. The blunt-toothed leaves, sometimes tinged purple, have no stinging hair and can add appeal to salads when young.

Henbit

Flowers of Henbit are longer and slimmer than violet deadnettle.

Henbit flowers provide a supply of pollen and nectar for long-tongued bees such as honey bees in March and April.

Henbit vs deadnettle

It depends on what you are looking for. Henbit is a good source of niacin and vitamin C, while dead nettle is a good source of calcium and magnesium. If you are looking for a nutritious weed, then henbit is the better choice. If you are looking for a weed that is easy to remove, then dead nettle is the better choice.

Henbit is a common weed that can be found in many gardens. It has small purple flowers and lance-shaped leaves. Dead nettle, also known as Lamium album, is a weed that can be found in many gardens. It has small white flowers and heart-shaped leaves. Henbit is a member of the mint family, while dead nettle is a member of the figwort family.

Henbit is a less aggressive weed than dead nettle. It can be easily pulled up from the ground, whereas dead nettle can be more difficult to remove. Henbit flowers from February to May, while dead nettle flowers from April to June. Henbitis found in North America and Europe, while dead nettle is found in North America, Europe, and Asia.

Henbit is a good source of niacin and vitamin C, while dead nettle is a good source of calcium and magnesium. Henbit can be used in salads or as a herb in dishes, while dead nettle canbe used in salads, soups, or stews.

Purple Dead Nettle Recipes

In the southeast, dead nettles (Lamium purpureum, Lamiaceae) are one of the first delicate purple-pink flowers to bloom, often as early as January. It is native to Eurasia and has adapted well to our fields, crops, towns, and lawns; it would then seek out our employment and ruin our way of life. The leaves and flowers may be used as a garnish in salads or fried in soups, stir-fries, and other dishes. Since it’s pubescent (a fancy term for hairy), I prefer to combine it with other greens or cook it to disguise its texture. Plants produce hairs for a variety of purposes, one of which is to avoid herbivory. It has an impact on me and several other two-legged mammals. In either case, this is a nibble weed, not the typical potherb wild green.

Nettle leaves are nearly entirely purple, slightly green.

To dry nettle leaves later: snip the plant 1⁄2″ from the tree.

Ingredients: 1 Tablespoon oil 1 Little onion, diced 1 Clove garlic, pinched 1 Cup washed nettle leaves 1 Cup of rice (measured after cooked and cooled) 1 Tsp of salt 1 Tsp of pepper 1 Egg 1⁄4 cup shredded cheese 1 Cup of milk 1 Mezzanine sauce or amino coconut Instructions for: Heat oil in medium hard bottom skillet.

Add onions, garlic and nettle leaves and sauté 2 minutes.

Purple Dead Nettle Rice Bake This purple dead nettle rice bake is simple to assemble and can be submerged in any nettle or green you have on hand, making it a flexible dish. 1 Olive oil spoon 1 Chopped onion 1 Minced garlic clove 1 Cup washed nettle leaves 1 Cup cooked rice weighed and cooled 1 tsp salt 1 tsp. 1 Egg 1⁄4 cup shredded cheese 1 Cup of milk 1 Mezzanine sauce or amino coconut Heat oil in medium hard bottom skillet.

Add onions, garlic and nettle leaves and sauté 2 minutes.

Purple Dead Nettle Soup

Wild Weeds Pesto with Dead Nettle

CONSULT YOUR DOCTOR BEFORE TAKING ANY HERBAL CONCOCTION

You may have violet dead nettle in your life: References and sources Five New Phenylethanoid Glycosides in Lamium purpureum L – Purple Dead Nettle compounds have potent free radical scavenging function Antioxidant and free radical scavenging processes of some Lamiaceae medicinal plants. In vivo anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive functions of some Lamium fungi.

Purple Dead Nettle Dye

Will it produce a Purple Dead Nettle Dye?

I set up a dye kitchen to make Purple Dead Nettle Dye.

For purple dead nettle dye, the plant is seen in spring and fall.

Materials required for Purple Dead Nettle Dye, Dye 150 grammes of pre-mordant yarn or fibre Water – the thread floats easily in the dye pot.

Modify Purple Nettle Dye Rewarm the dye to 200 degrees Fahrenheit.

The Purple Dead Nettle colour should have shifted to a sage green or dark green colour.

How did you like Purple Dead Nettle Dye?

(Video) Stinging Nettle Benefits: Side Effects of Stinging Nettle

FAQs

Purple Dead Nettle: Facts, Uses and Nutrition? ›

Dead nettle leaves can also be used to stop bleeding or placed on wounds due to its anti-fungal and anti-bacterial compounds. Dead nettle is highly nutritious – like any other dark leafy green, it's high in vitamins C, A, and K, iron, calcium, magnesium, manganese, and fiber.

What are the health benefits of purple dead nettle? ›

Purple dead nettle also has medicinal benefits. It is known in the herbal world as being astringent, diuretic, diaphoretic and purgative. It's also anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and anti-fungal. The leaves can be used on external wounds or cuts, or as a poultice, similar to how you would use yarrow or plantain.

Can you eat purple dead nettle? ›

Purple dead nettle is easily identified by its square stem, spade-shaped leaves, and purple tops. Depending upon the quality of the soil, the lower leaves may be green, or all of the leaves may be purple. More purple leaves just means a phosphorus deficiency in the soil, but they're all completely safe to eat.

What is red dead nettle good for? ›

In terms of traditional medicinal uses, dried leaves have been used as a poultice to stem hemorrhaging whilst fresh bruised leaves have been applied to external wounds and cuts. The leaves are also made into a tea and drunk to promote perspiration and discharge from the kidneys in treating chills.

How does purple dead nettle help with allergies? ›

Quercetin flavonoids found in deadnettle reduce the inflammatory reactivity of the immune system and counteract oxidation. Relieves allergy symptoms and reactivity. Quercetin also encourages histamine release to help reduce allergy symptoms.

Can you eat raw dead nettle? ›

Young dead nettle leaves have a mild, lightly peppered taste when eaten raw and they can be a fantastic addition to your salad. They're also a great substitute for more common greens, like spinach, kale, and lettuce. You can also blend them with other greens and some lemon juice to make a delicious green smoothie.

What vitamins are in dead nettle? ›

Dead nettle leaves can also be used to stop bleeding or placed on wounds due to its anti-fungal and anti-bacterial compounds. Dead nettle is highly nutritious – like any other dark leafy green, it's high in vitamins C, A, and K, iron, calcium, magnesium, manganese, and fiber.

What does purple dead nettle taste like? ›

It has a mild, slightly grassy, somewhat floral flavor, and the purple tops are even a little sweet. Although it is in the mint family, it doesn't have a minty taste. It can be used in salads, soups, blended into smoothies or made into a tea.

What is the difference between purple dead nettle and stinging nettle? ›

Purple dead nettle is a bit of a mixed-up plant. It earned its name, dead nettle, because the leaves are similar to stinging nettle. However, because there are no stings on the leaves, it's considered 'dead'. To top it all off, it's not even a true nettle – it's a mint.

Why is it called dead nettle? ›

Commonly called dead nettles because their leaves resemble stinging nettles with no ability to sting, this near-evergreen plant (in mild climates) is a low creeper; some cultivars become randomly mounded.

How do you eat purple nettle? ›

Edible Spring Food

Purple dead nettle can be eaten fresh, sprinkled in salads, or used in pestos. To be honest, I think the fresh leaves taste like a cross between spinach and overcooked green beans that have sat out at a buffet all day, so I like them only sparingly incorporated into food products.

When should I drink nettle tea? ›

Also consumed as a vegetable, nettles contain an impressive array of nutrients, phytochemicals, and other bioactives with a host of health-promoting properties. And in my opinion, it's a perfect herbal tea to start your morning out right.

How long does purple dead nettle last? ›

Flowers. The purple deadnettle has distinctive pink flowers which will typically bloom in April, and they last for about six weeks. At that point it produces four nutlet seeds, which can be used to replant for additional growth.

Is henbit Deadnettle poisonous? ›

Henbit does not smell minty, but it is an edible mint. By they way, there are no poisonous look alikes. As for toxicity, we're safe but it has causes “staggers” in sheep, horses, and cattle.

Is purple dead nettle toxic to dogs? ›

No, purple dead-nettle is not poisonous to dogs, but it seems that dogs are not attracted to this plant.

How do you harvest purple nettle? ›

Collecting dead nettle is fairly simple. Snip the stems about ½” from the ground, and gently shake to remove any dirt or bugs. You can use any collection container you wish, as there is no need to worry about spreading spores as you would foraging mushrooms. Like all mint, they reproduce from their roots.

What is the difference between purple dead nettle and henbit? ›

Henbit flowers are pink to purple with darker purple spots than those of purple deadnettle. The flowers of henbit are longer and more slender than those of purple deadnettle. The leaves of purple deadnettle at the apex of the stems are tinted purple and fade to green as they mature.

Videos

1. Stinging Nettle — The Most Nutritious Plant On Earth?
(Learn Your Land)
2. Purple dead-nettle
(courtneybrad)
3. Henbit and Purple Deadnettle
(Sanctum of the Craft)
4. Edible & Medicinal Plants of the Northwest; Plant Profile: Purple Dead Nettle (Lamium Purpureum L.)
(Make Well )
5. Purple Dead Nettle wild edible!
(The Appalachian American)
6. Is It Henbit or Purple Deadnettle? — How to Tell
(Survivalkraft)

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